DroneXL.co
DJI's Vision, Mision and Values internal document revealed

DJI’s Vision, Mision and Values internal document revealed

Yesterday, we reported on DJI’s sweeping cuts in the ‘Long March’ reforms based on an article from Reuters. In the article, DJI’s ‘Vision, Mission and Values’ document was mentioned that was published internally by the dronemaker in December of 2019. We were able to get our hands on this document, and are sharing it here with you.

DJI’s Vision, Mision, and Values internal document revealed

DJI is a private company and any real sales, revenue, or profit numbers are hard to come by since the company does not need to file such information publicly. As a result, very little is known about the Chinese dronemaker when it comes to its overall performance or any other internal information.

When Reuters mentioned DJI’s ‘Vision and Values’ document, I was keen on getting a copy. Luckily one of our sources was able to share the document with us and after translating it with Google Translate, I’m sharing it here with you.

Please keep in mind that Google Translate is not perfect so there are likely to be some inaccuracies

DJI’s Vision, Mision, and Values don’t shed much light on the dronemaker

Don’t get too excited though as the document is very vague and really doesn’t give us all that much information about DJI. It is written in a very generic style and might as well apply to any other company out there. For instance, the name DJI does not appear even once.

DJI explains in the document that their mission is to be ‘a technology company that continues to promote human progress,’ and to be ‘a pioneer in the era of space intelligence.’ The dronemaker also states as part of their mission that they strive to let the ‘beauty of technology exceed imagination.’ And, it says that ‘life without reflection and progress is not worth living.

The document seems to emphasize being a dreamer with a practical spirit, creating excitement, celebrating success, and being confident. All very aspirational terms but also quite vague at the same time.

DJI strives to be customer-centric

At various points in the pdf, DJI also points to the importance of being customer-centric, fully engaging with users, and to understand their needs. DJI says that its employees and the company should look in the mirror and correct your (its) own shortcomings. Well, it seems that DJI has its work cut out for them as I’m sure that anyone who’s ever had to deal with DJI’s customer service department can testify.

About Missions, Visions and Values

Overall it seems that DJI’s Vision, Mission and Values document is inspired by the famous management guru Peter Drucker and the Management by Objectives (MBO) or Management by Results (MBR) style of working.

In 1973, Peter Drucker said: “That business purpose and business mission are so rarely given adequate thought is perhaps the most important cause of business frustration and failure.”

A mission can be described as a clear, concise, and enduring statement of the reasons for an organization’s existence today, whereas a vision represents the future purpose of the organization. The values of a company and its employees are meant to support both the mission and the vision.

The Strategic Thinking Institute explains that mission statements should be clear, and concise, answering questions such as what, how, who and why? Vision statements are supposed to be even more concise, for instance, take a look at Microsoft’s statement.

Micorsoft: A computer on every desk, and in every home.

For DJI such a vision statement might look something like this, ‘a drone in the hands of every photography enthusiast.’

A list of company values should also be precise and concise, ideally consisting of three to five values. Anything more is a laundry list and ‘becomes unwieldy to use in the day-to-day decision-making process,’ according to Rich Horwath, the president of the Strategic Thinking Institute.

Two good examples are these from Walmart and McDonald’s.

Wal-Mart: Excellence, customer service, respect to employees.
McDonald’s: Quality, consistency, cleanliness, value.

My point here is not to start an online MBA course, but only to provide some context before you start reading through DJI’s Vision, Mission and Values document. Obviously, DJI is a Chinese company and it may, therefore, have very different beliefs and ideas around these business principles and how to communicate them effectively. You can download a pdf version of DJI’s document here.

Please let us know your thoughts in the comments below. I’m very interested in hearing what you think of this DJI document. DJI's'Vision and Values' document

DJI's'Vision and Values' document

DJI's'Vision and Values' document

DJI's'Vision and Values' document

DJI's'Vision and Values' document

DJI's'Vision and Values' document

Flying drones as a career?

If you want to turn your hobby into your career, practice how to fly your drone safely, and learn what it takes to get your Part 107, be sure to check out the excellent training modules from The Drone U.

DroneU Marketing Banner Ad 1

Stay in touch!

If you’d like to stay up to date with all the latest drone news, scoops, rumors, and reviews, then follow us on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram or…

Subscribe to our Daily Drone News email.*


 

Submit tips If you have information or tips that you would like to share with us, feel free to submit them hereSupport DroneXL.co: You can support DroneXL.co by using these links when you make your next drone purchase: Adorama, Amazon, B&H, BestBuy, eBay, DJI, Parrot, and Yuneec. We make a small commission when you do so at no additional expense to you. Thank you for helping DroneXL grow! FTC: DroneXL.co uses affiliate links that generate income.


* We do not sell, share, rent out or spam your email, ever. Our email goes out on weekdays around 5:30 p.m.

Haye Kesteloo

2 comments

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  • Thanks for sharing the information from this document. I have worked at various companies and organizations that always had a laundry list of mission statement objectives. Lots of sentences that made no sense with reality in regards to the organization. As you stated, you need a one sentence mission statement or objective for a company or organization so all can clearly understand it. Clear and to the point.

  • Interesting find. My first reaction is that I’m a bit surprised with the lack of branding found within the document. These types of strategy documents, while internal, are always heavily branded to help tell the story of the brand, especially for those who are not yet familiar with the concepts, mission, values, etc. Thanks for sharing.

%d bloggers like this: